Advocate Newsletter

Public Safety LTE Deployments

Another lesson from these tests is that when the network was overloaded, that is, we tried to push more data and video over the system than it could handle, not only was the last data or video unusable, it also rendered existing data and video transmissions that were already in use unusable or at least unstable.


My Most Recent FCC Filing

However, it is my contention, and that of many others, that while the FCC does need to impose some rules that will help ensure nationwide interoperability, many of the items in the FNPRM should remain the purview of the various standards bodies that are working on the LTE and subsequent air-interface standards and that many other items should be determined by a Nationwide Network Governance Entity (NNGE).



700-MHz Public Safety Spectrum Status Report

2011 is a pivotal year for Public Safety communications. It is a year when, I am confident, Congress will vote to reallocate the D Block to Public Safety, the narrowband 700-MHz channels will remain as they are, and some of the organizations that obtained waivers to build out their 700-MHz broadband systems will bring them online.





700-MHz Narrowband/Broadband Sharing–My Comments

The goal of the PSHSB should be to provide public safety with a roadmap for BOTH nationwide interoperable voice and data services. To that end, the narrowband spectrum must be reserved for narrowband voice services and the broadband portion of the public safety spectrum reserved for fully interoperable broadband services.


FCC Paper Proves Need for D Block Reallocation

The recent T-Mobile white paper on capacity that was submitted in an attempt to prove that 10 MHz of spectrum is enough for Public Safety, the authors used a spectral efficiency of 2.0 Bps/Hz. I stated in my response that this was too high and that 1.3 bps/Hz should have been used. The FCC itself validates my position that the T-Mobile white paper was based on inaccurate information.